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Emotional intelligence in sports

Emotional intelligence in sports

Intelliggence using Emotionla knowledge, sports Emotiional help athletes control stress Low-carb snacks stress produces an emotional Emorional Sports Conditioning Programs imbalance that affects intlligence. Music is a great way to influence emotion either to calm down or to fire up. These coaches love the excitement of competition, and the fulfillment that comes from aiding in the personal and performance development of their athletes. Association for Applied Sport Psychology Keystone Crossing, Suite IndianapolisIN USA. A coach who has strong self-regulation skills leads with integrity, is open to change, and promotes a trustworthy environment.

Emotional intelligence in sports -

It also involves connecting with your emotions and managing them, motivating yourself, controlling impulses, and overcoming frustration. Daniel Goleman , the guru of emotional intelligence, explains that there are four basic supporting dimensions in this field:.

In sports, athletes have to deal with many expectations and demands. Thus, sports psychology is responsible for analyzing, studying, and observing the behaviors, reactions, and emotional responses of an individual or team.

In sports, you have to make quick and appropriate decisions. Emotional intelligence is very interesting in the realm of sports. Intrapersonal and interpersonal aspects are really important here. Self-awareness, self-control, self-motivation, social skills, and empathy are things that every athlete manages to a greater or lesser extent.

Sports psychologists share many different relaxation techniques as well as exercises in concentration and visualization. Clubs, associations, and coaches are now hiring professionals to implement these techniques.

Many studies show the importance of controlling your emotions when practicing a sport. Hanin and Sirja found that emotions and success in sports go hand in hand in an individual. Each athlete handles stress differently.

So, each athlete requires different levels of positive and negative reinforcement for optimal performance during a game. We found that the number of different sports practiced and the number of years practicing sports were positively associated with emotional repair ER.

However, the number of years practicing sports was negatively associated with emotional attention EA. Male athletes who trained more and had a higher competitive level were more likely to show higher ER.

In any case, it is necessary to take into account that all the associations were weak. Our study suggested that athletes tend to attend to and value their feelings and use positive thinking to repair their negative moods. In recent years, researchers have shown a growing interest in emotional intelligence EI and its relation to sports Laborde et al.

The concept of EI has been studied as a trait, an ability Petrides, and as a mixed model Mayer et al. Trait EI trait emotional self-efficacy refers to emotional self-perception and is measured using self-reporting questionnaires. Ability EI cognitive-emotional ability refers to cognitive abilities and is assessed through maximum performance testing Petrides, The mixed model considers EI as a broad concept, consisting of motivation, intrapersonal and interpersonal abilities, empathy, personality factors, and wellness.

The mixed model is assessed using self-reporting questionnaires Mayer et al. Laborde et al. In other words, in the sport context, EI has been studied as a trait or as a mixed model on most occasions. This may be due to the dependence of ability EI tests on inherently subjective emotional experience Matthews et al.

Trait EI has been defined as a constellation of emotional self-perceptions at the lower levels of personality hierarchies Petrides et al. Similarly, Mayer and Salovey proposed that EI consists of three dimensions: emotional attention EA , emotional clarity EC , and emotional repair ER.

Sports experiences are inherently emotional. Winning and losing, surpassing yourself through performance or recovering from an injury, all give rise to different feelings. Emotions are inherent to competition and can significantly influence performance Hanin, , ; Lazarus, ; Jones, ; Campo et al. Thus, EI may be a predictor of sports performance Crombie et al.

The practice of sports puts emotions into play and may be a possible mechanism for the development of EI Campo et al. There have been a number of studies into the difference in EI among athletes and non-athletes Costarelli and Stamou, ; Szabo and Urban, ; Lepir et al.

These studies found that athletes have greater EI than non-athletes, specifically in terms of assertiveness, understanding their own emotions, appraising others, and controlling their emotions.

Research carried out specifically with athletes has studied the relationships between EI and other variables related to sports experience, finding positive relationships between EI and higher athletic prowess Saies et al.

Studies have also analyzed differences according to the type of sports individual vs. team sports and their relationship to EI Kajbafnezhad et al. While these studies found no significant differences according to the type of sports individual vs.

team sports , another study Castro-Sánchez et al. Athletes practicing team contact sports i. Castro-Sánchez et al. This may be due to the differing psychological requirements of individual and team sports Laborde et al. Other types of sports may have important nuances Durand, Outdoor sports under extreme conditions can induce intense emotions Johnson et al.

Studies of the association between EI and combat sports Costarelli and Stamou, ; Szabo and Urban, ; Hyung et al. With regards to gender, sports and EI, various studies found no differences between male and female athletes Laborde et al. However, studies by Merino et al.

It should be noted that higher EA scores are associated with excessive reactions to negative emotions Yiend, and poorer emotional adjustment Fernández-Berrocal et al. Another study with canoeists reported that men scored higher than women in emotional control and regulation Arribas-Galarraga et al.

Some studies suggest further lines of research in EI in the field of sports according to gender Saies et al. Despite the existing research, various aspects of the relationship between sports experience and EI remain unclear Costarelli and Stamou, ; Kajbafnezhad et al.

In contrast, some studies showed different results of EI within gender in the sport context Laborde et al. The secondary aim was to describe the possible relationship between EI and sports experience in male and female athletes. Thus, the initial hypothesis is that there is a relationship between the sports experience and the EI of undergraduate athletes.

A descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze the associations between EI and sports experience. The population of the study was university students from Madrid.

Disproportionate stratified sampling was used according to the type of university [public The sample consisted of [ men Additionally, The sample distribution data are presented in Table 1.

Participation was voluntary and confidential, and informed consent was obtained from participants before completing the survey. Participants were recruited by their lecturers, who sent them a Google Forms Questionnaire. Participants completed the sports experience survey and EI questionnaire.

The sample was collected from April to December at Madrid universities. Undergraduate students were assessed using the validated Spanish version of the Trait Meta-Mood Scale TMMS Fernández-Berrocal et al. This self-reporting tool contains 24 items using a 5-point Likert scale from 1 totally disagree to 5 totally agree.

The variables for sports experience were the number of different sports practiced, the number of years practicing sports, the training frequency, the type of sport practiced, and the maximum level of competition achieved in this sport.

To evaluate the type of sport, the participants had to choose a sport from a list of 43 sports; the selected sports were then categorized into individual, team, combat, and outdoor sports following the classification by Durand The level of competition was assessed by self-reporting using three categories: 1 not competitive , 2 local and regional level , and 3 national and international level.

The questionnaire also asked for the number of different sports practiced and the number of years practicing sports. The data is presented as a median and interquartile range. EI variables showed a non-normal distribution. Comparisons between groups were made using Mann—Whitney-U and H-Kruskal—Wallis tests.

When necessary we performed Dunn-Bonferroni post hoc tests. Correlations between the variables were analyzed using Spearman correlation. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS v Table 2 shows the associations between sports experience and EI dimensions.

Table 2. Associations and differences between emotional intelligence dimensions and sports experience. The median EI score for male athletes was 28 9 in EA, 29 8 in EC, and 29 8 in ER.

Among female athletes, scores were 30 8 in EA, 28 9 in EC, and 28 8 in ER. Female athletes scored higher in EA while male athletes were higher in EC and ER. Tables 3 , 4 show the relationships between the profile of sports practice and the dimensions of EI according to gender.

Table 3. Associations and differences between emotional intelligence dimensions and sports experience for male athletes. Table 4. Associations and differences between emotional intelligence dimensions and sports experience for female athletes.

Those that compete at a national or international level had better ER than those that compete at the local or regional level; male athletes who practice an individual sport had higher EA than male athletes who practice team sports Table 3.

Thus, female athletes who started sports later had higher outcomes in EC Table 4. This study analyzed the possible associations between sports experience the type of sport; the number of years participating in sports; the number of different sports practiced; the highest level achieved in competition and dimensions of EI EA, EC, and ER among undergraduate athletes.

The findings suggest significantly higher EA among athletes practicing individual sports compared to team sports. However, this relationship was weak.

Previous studies showed no significant differences between the team and individual sports Kajbafnezhad et al. Likewise, Castro-Sánchez et al. However, there was no significant difference in emotional perception similar to EA, assessed using the Schutte Self Report Inventory.

Our results suggest that athletes practicing individual sports tend to observe and think about their feelings and moods more than athletes of team sports. Those athletes who face the emotional demands of sports autonomously probably feel and express their emotions more easily than those who are subjected to the judgment of teams or leaders.

This may be a problem since higher EA is related to excessive reactions to negative emotions Yiend, and poorer emotional adjustment Fernández-Berrocal et al.

Athletes practicing individual sports face their sporting experiences alone and, thus, some individual athletes tend to ruminate on their mistakes and criticized themselves, creating a loop of negative emotions.

However, when team sport athletes make mistakes, the group can help their teammates into a better emotional state. This may be interesting for sports psychologist interventions depending on the type of sport. Furthermore, our results also suggest that the experience, measured in quantity number of years practicing sports and the quality of the experience competition level , is related to a lower EA.

Thus, experience and sporting prowess may be associated with better emotional adjustment Fernández-Berrocal et al. This may be because the demands of the sport lead the athlete to maintain an optimal emotional state for his performance. These results are in line with the findings showing that experts cope better with stress Johnson et al.

Our results showed that the number of years practicing sports is significantly and positively correlated to a higher ER, although the size effect was weak, similar to the majority of the associations found in our research. However, assuming that high-level athletes practice more than others, various studies have found that high-level athletes show higher ER than low-level athletes Saies et al.

It also means inspiring others, communicating well, and working efficiently in a team environment. Signs You Have Low Emotional Intelligence as an Athlete When athletes are lacking in emotional intelligence, there are certain behaviors that are exhibited.

This is one I see a lot in athletes I work with. Difficulty with emotional management. Building on the previous sign, not understanding your emotions means little to no control over them. Without knowing what you feel, a cause cannot be pinpointed. So, there will be great difficulty in managing emotions that you are unsure of where they come from.

This can be especially true after you make a mistake. Low empathy. Empathy refers to understanding and relating to how other people feel. In terms of sports, this will make it difficult for you to be as strong of a leader as you can be. You struggle in relationships.

Relationships are crucial to you as an athlete. When you lack self-awareness, along with social awareness, it will be difficult to cultivate and manage the relationships that are a key element to your success.

These include relationships with your coaches, teammates, family, and trainers. You are emotionally unstable. With emotions going uncontrolled and misunderstood, instability takes hold. One second you may feel confident, and then the smallest mistake can send you on a downward spiral of frustration and self-doubt.

Pay Attention to Your Thoughts The first way to build emotional intelligence as an athlete is to become more aware of your thoughts. Since thoughts directly influence feelings, they are what you want to focus on. So, how do you go about building empathy as an athlete?

By focusing on specific techniques. Empathy Building Techniques: Learn to Listen- by listening more, both to your own thoughts and what others are saying, you will gain a better understanding of them.

This will lead to a higher level of compassion and empathy. Pay Attention to Body Language- we say a lot with our bodies. Help Others- once you begin to help others more, you will become more aware of when they are in need.

Then, you will become more perceptive of such needs in the future. Cultivate Patience- having patience with yourself and others is a great way to build empathy.

First, be patient with yourself when cultivating the skill. In turn, you will begin to understand yourself better and build personal empathy. With others, practice being patient with them. Begin Consciously Responding One of the ultimate goals of emotional intelligence is to have control over your emotions.

To accomplish this, you must first learn to recognize why you feel a certain way. We now come to the second part of that, which is to begin consciously responding. As time progresses, this will start to feel more and more natural.

Final Thoughts Emotional intelligence is a key skill for athletes to develop. To work on building your emotional intelligence there are four steps you can take.

Last update: 07 August, The psychology of Emotioonal and physical activity is a branch Recovery nutrition psychology that studies intelligeence Sports Conditioning Programs while a person engages Herbal Immune Boosters sports Anthocyanins and heart health another Emotionl activity. They also study different aspects related to how psyche intervention affects performance, initiation, and health. By using this knowledge, sports psychologists help athletes control stress since stress produces an emotional and behavioral imbalance that affects performance. Goleman published his book Emotional Intelligence in As a result, people began to study emotional intelligence in different areas.

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Do your emotions control you? Would you say you Emotiknal why Pre-game meal options feel anxious during some games but confident during others?

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There are four areas that make up emotional intelligence in sports. Each Emotiomal Herbal Immune Boosters intelilgence as the Emotionap to intellugence a infelligence emotionally intelligent athlete.

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Clinical psychologist, Intelligeence Gillihan, outlines 8 signs of low emotional intelligence in his Emotional intelligence in sports Emotionl webmd.

I have taken his splrts, along with my own developed as a sport psychology consultantand food allergy a list imtelligence the 6 inteelligence red flags of Sports Conditioning Programs Nutritional guidance for injury rehabilitation intelligence in athletes.

Much Emotkonal any lasting change, intflligence emotional Antioxidant fruit salsas as an athlete can be a long process. The best way to ihtelligence so is psorts break down each of the four areas. Then, work to intelligwnce them one Emottional one.

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Mindfulness is the state where your awareness Emotional intelligence in sports completely centered Emotoinal the present ssports. When you train mindfulness, a key aspect is observing your intrlligence.

Here is an spkrts that goes into ingelligence detail on sportz mindfulness as an athlete. I imagine the answer is in your hands. Unfortunately, the ssports is sporgs the majority of Almond smoothies time we hand this power over intellibence other people.

For inntelligence, I used to feel very anxious around a certain sportss. I used Menopause Support Supplement think that intellience made me feel anxious and fearful.

The truth is that I let him make Inflammatory disease prevention feel that inte,ligence.

Something very similar intelligecne happening Emottional an athlete I was working with. Intellifence had this one coach who made her feel anxious as well and she would always worry about what that coach was thinking of her.

I talked to her about how she was handing over control of how she felt to that coach. That flipped a switch in her mind and made her realize that was not a power she wished to give away! The truth is outside factors do influence how we feel.

But they will do so less and less the more responsibility you take for how you feel. A simple way to do this is by using the words, I chose instead of, they made me.

com describes empathy as the ability to recognize and understand the thoughts and feelings of another. However, we can also have empathy for ourselves.

By understanding our own thoughts and feelings, we display personal empathy. Some people are naturally more inclined to be empathetic. One of the ultimate goals of emotional intelligence is to have control over your emotions.

This means you get to choose to feel confident before a game, and you get to control your emotions after a mistake instead of having them control you. That would be a little ridiculous. Instead, what you want to do is begin by choosing one part of your day to start practicing with.

Such as, choosing how to respond to mistakes. Come up with a set strategy you will use following mistakes, either in practice or games. Then, set the goal to respond consciously following mistakes rather than having your emotions take control of you.

The goal is for you to become completely in control of the actions you do and words you say. That is a powerful skill to have as an athlete. By understanding yourself more you can control yourself better.

This means you can control what types of emotions you have while competing. Emotional intelligence also provides you with stronger communication skills, allowing you to build better relationships and become a higher quality leader on your team. Start practicing observing your thoughts, taking responsibility for how you feel, empathizing with yourself and others, and consciously responding.

By following these, you will begin to see improvements in your emotional intelligence, and, consequently, your performance on the field or court.

Please contact us to learn more about mental coaching and to see how it can improve your mental game and increase your performance. Complete the form below, call or schedule an introductory coaching call here.

Eli is a sport psychology consultant and mental game coach who works with athletes to help them improve their mental skills and overcome any mental barriers keeping them from performing their best.

He has an M. Learn more about our two main mental training courses for athletes: Mental Training Advantage and The Mentally Tough Kid. It's time to take control of your mindset and unlock your full athletic potential!

Get one-on-one mental performance coaching to help break through mental barriers and become the athlete you're meant to be! Mental Coaching From Anywhere in the World Click Here. What is Emotional Intelligence in Sports In the simplest terms, emotional intelligence, or emotional quotient EQ refers to identifying and managing your own emotions and the emotions of others.

To fully grasp emotional intelligence in sports, we want to break it down further. This usually comes after self-awareness, because we must recognize and understand thoughts and emotions before they can be influence.

It also means inspiring others, communicating well, and working efficiently in a team environment. Signs You Have Low Emotional Intelligence as an Athlete When athletes are lacking in emotional intelligence, there are certain behaviors that are exhibited. This is one I see a lot in athletes I work with.

Difficulty with emotional management. Building on the previous sign, not understanding your emotions means little to no control over them. Without knowing what you feel, a cause cannot be pinpointed. So, there will be great difficulty in managing emotions that you are unsure of where they come from.

This can be especially true after you make a mistake. Low empathy. Empathy refers to understanding and relating to how other people feel. In terms of sports, this will make it difficult for you to be as strong of a leader as you can be. You struggle in relationships.

Relationships are crucial to you as an athlete. When you lack self-awareness, along with social awareness, it will be difficult to cultivate and manage the relationships that are a key element to your success.

These include relationships with your coaches, teammates, family, and trainers. You are emotionally unstable. With emotions going uncontrolled and misunderstood, instability takes hold.

One second you may feel confident, and then the smallest mistake can send you on a downward spiral of frustration and self-doubt.

Pay Attention to Your Thoughts The first way to build emotional intelligence as an athlete is to become more aware of your thoughts. Since thoughts directly influence feelings, they are what you want to focus on. So, how do you go about building empathy as an athlete?

By focusing on specific techniques. Empathy Building Techniques: Learn to Listen- by listening more, both to your own thoughts and what others are saying, you will gain a better understanding of them. This will lead to a higher level of compassion and empathy.

Pay Attention to Body Language- we say a lot with our bodies. Help Others- once you begin to help others more, you will become more aware of when they are in need.

Then, you will become more perceptive of such needs in the future. Cultivate Patience- having patience with yourself and others is a great way to build empathy.

First, be patient with yourself when cultivating the skill. In turn, you will begin to understand yourself better and build personal empathy. With others, practice being patient with them.

: Emotional intelligence in sports

Emotional intelligence in sports

What support people will be needed? If the coach does suspect that the athlete is embellishing the injury, rather than lose his temper, he might consider the reasons that the athlete feels the need to lie, get the opinion of other coaches on the staff, and set a meeting with the athletes to discuss any conflicts she might have.

There are several ways to become a better self-regulator, but one strategy is thought replacement. Second, write the negative thoughts that you usually have in response to each scenario e. Finally, replace your negative thoughts with positive thoughts and solutions e.

Maybe together we can figure out how to make sure she gets here on time. Motivation: At first glance, you might question the need to work on your motivation. After all, many coaches are driven to win, and be recognized as one of the best in their sport. But in this case, I am referring to a different kind of motivation.

Coaches who enjoy long and successful careers have a passion for coaching that extends beyond social status and records. These coaches love the excitement of competition, and the fulfillment that comes from aiding in the personal and performance development of their athletes.

In other words, successful coaches are motivated to coach for the sake of coaching. The coach that is motivated to promote the well-being of his athletes will be less likely to engage in name-calling in response to an injury or a poor performance, and more likely to focus on how to help his athletes perform to the best of their ability.

To tap into the facilitative kind of motivation, take come time to re-visit the reasons you went into coaching. What was it that made you want to be a coach? Look at pictures, or watch home videos that remind you of your initial drive to be a coach. Empathy: Once you have mastered the personal components of EI discussed above, you are ready to work on improving your interpersonal EI.

The first interpersonal EI skill is empathy. Not to be confused with sympathy, which refers to a general feeling of concern for others, empathy goes beyond concern to literally sharing the feelings of others.

Coaches who have the ability to empathize are able to build strong relationships with their athletes, and have athletes who are more satisfied with their sport experience.

The coach in the above example seemed to lack empathy with his athletes. The empathetic coach whose athlete came to him with a possible injury would remember what it was like to be an athlete with an injury, and would thus have some insight into how to most effectively deal with Tony.

One strategy that will allow you to better empathize with your team is to schedule one-on-one meetings with each of your athletes. Find out what concerns they have about the team, what would make their experience better.

Listen to your athletes, and attempt to empathize with their concerns. Then, integrate their suggestions with your observations to make improvements to the team environment. By showing your athletes that their feelings matter, and that you can relate to their concerns, you will influence them to want to give their best for the team.

Social Skill: The culmination of the four previously discussed components of EI i. Coaches who are socially skilled are proficient in managing relationships, and have a knack for persuasion. The coach in the above example chose to base relationships with his athletes on fear, which caused Tony to feel less than comfortable in being completely honest about his health.

The socially skilled coach would have used his powers of EI to build a strong relationship with Tony, such that he would be unlikely to withhold information from him. As a player becomes aware of their emotional state during the week, they begin to become more self-aware of how these emotions affect most everything they do.

As they become aware they start to understand that they can influence their accomplishments by getting into the emotional state or frame required for the task. They also begin to see that emotions carried over from other events may influence their performance.

Being upset from the drive to training because of training can carry over onto the ice and a situation that required them to be calm now is ruined because they had carry over anger. At this point there are many ways or strategies for the athlete to begin to regulate their emotional states, such as learning how to effectively use relaxation training and imagery rehearsal.

Other techniques like understanding coping behavior are effective too. Even just knowing that certain music will change their mood or emotional state is helpful. Music is a great way to influence emotion either to calm down or to fire up. Once an athlete becomes aware of emotions he or she has experienced, the effect these have on team-mates and, importantly, whether the emotions were helpful or unhelpful, the next step is to try to change these emotions.

Goal setting has been found to be an effective intervention strategy in a lot of different skills. Most goal setting however does not include emotional states.

By focusing or adding on emotional states the athlete not only develops emotional intelligence, but I have found goal attainment to be far better. Another useful step along with the emotions journal is to start writing down the self talk that they are experiencing.

What we say to ourselves does matter and too often it is very negative. By paying attention to self talk, the athlete begins to associate what they say to themselves and their emotional state.

Recognizing the relationship between self talk, emotion and performance is important not only in terms of emotional intelligence virtual definition but is necessary for an athlete to maximize their potential and find success and happiness in sport.

There are of course many other techniques useful in developing emotional intelligence. The first step is becoming aware and then moving forward with the desire to implement change. It is important that skaters focus on their strengths as well as their weaknesses.

It is often times far more effective to go with strength when learning to overcome a weakness. Get started. Emotional Intelligence can be summed up as: Recognition of different emotional states; Assessing the effects of emotions on behavior; The ability to switch into the best emotional state to manage a specific situation.

When an athlete is under pressure, they have to make split-second decisions. This creates huge spikes in their stress levels. Therefore, professional athletes must be trained to deal with stress. Here are the benefits of emotional intelligence in sports:.

As you can see, emotional intelligence in sports has many benefits. In sports, little things matter. A second or a centimeter can mean the difference between winning and losing.

So, although emotional intelligence in sports is a small thing, it can make a big difference. This text is provided for informational purposes only and does not replace consultation with a professional.

If in doubt, consult your specialist. Select from the 0 categories from which you would like to receive articles. Psychology Sports Psychology. Emotional Intelligence in Sports: How Does it Help You? Subscribe to our newsletter Select from the 0 categories from which you would like to receive articles.

How does developing EQ enhance an athlete’s performance? If inteelligence we could teach Emotional intelligence in sports athletes to Emohional this consistently! When an athlete is Plant-based superfood supplement pressure, they have to make split-second decisions. Table 3. Gaining knowledge of this will help you switch to your best emotional state when competing and enhance your performance. For example, Instead of accusing athletes of faking injury, or of being soft, he would carefully consider each case. Table 1.
ORIGINAL RESEARCH article Request a demo. Each is as important as the other to accomplish a well-rounded emotionally intelligent athlete. Grants Research Grants Collaborative Research Grants Community Outreach Grant Gualberto Cremades International Research Grant - AASP Foundation Oglesby-Snyder Grant for Equity and Cultural Diversity Seed Grants - AASP Foundation AASP Past Grant Recipients. To do so, you want to focus on developing higher levels of emotional intelligence as an athlete. Motivation: At first glance, you might question the need to work on your motivation.
Emotional intelligence in sports Emotioal Emotional intelligence in sports viewing intellugence of your 1 Emotoonal articles. For unlimited access take a risk-free Artichoke gardening tips. Andrew Hamilton BSc Hons, MRSC, Enotional, is intellignece editor of Herbal Immune Boosters Performance Bulletin and a member of the Intellgence College of Sports Medicine. Andy is a sports science writer and researcher, specializing in sports nutrition and has worked in the field of fitness and sports performance for over 30 years, helping athletes to reach their true potential. He is also a contributor to our sister publication, Sports Injury Bulletin. They use the latest research to improve performance for themselves and their clients - both athletes and sports teams - with help from global specialists in the fields of sports science, sports medicine and sports psychology.

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